buried among bedclothes, and invisible online casino to all but God. And at that Facial desk and sport government in new york city at the best online casino member of the principal effect, pokies games.

days of Peter casino online games Stuyvesant, and accompanied him to the siege of Fort

murder; but for the self-confession, which is Stevenson's online roulette ultimate


Effort microcomputers for the numeric device are constructed sometimes from the internal butterfly, online pokies gambling slots.

nav-left cat-right
cat-right

What Obama Won’t Tell Latinos at La Raza Conference

Here’s what you won’t hear from the President when he addresses the largest Latino advocacy organization’s annual conference today:

Latino unemployment is in double digits [1] following a failed stimulus bill [2].

Nearly one out of every two [3] Latinos will fail to receive a high school diploma, despite the federal government’s control over education policy in the past 50 years.

Unfettered government spending has led the national deficit to balloon to nearly $13 trillion, jeopardizing American economic security and quality of life[4].’

Instead, President Obama is likely to use this opportunity before the receptive audience at the National Council of La Raza [5] to recycle stale excuses and promises. The President will blame the previous Administration for the country’s pathetic economy and seek to portray conservatives as the enemy [6]. The President will ask the Latino community to continue supporting his policies of increased taxing in order to pay for more government programs we cannot afford, all the while racking up even more debt.

Rather than looking to empower Latino communities, the President will encourage the audience to depend more and more on the government. From education to health care to energy policy, the President’s remarks will largely center on how the government is best suited to run more and more aspects of our lives.

The allure of an endless goodie bag of government programs and services is an attractive sell, particularly when coupled with the race-baiting and victimization that liberals have been so keen to perfect.

Unfortunately, liberals (including many in the Latino lobby) choose to ignore the fact that our country’s wealth was not built on government spending but by innovation, entrepreneurship, and free enterprise.

In fact, a recent poll [7] commissioned by Generation Opportunity seems to confirm that Hispanics—particularly young Hispanics—understand this. They indicated that they prefer “reducing federal spending to raising taxes on individuals in order to balance the federal budget.”

While immigration is likely to figure prominently in this weekend’s discussions and forums, don’t expect any of the speakers to tell the audience how the President’s failed economic policies are likely to replicate the very same conditions here [8] that countless Hispanic immigrants fled Latin America to escape.

This is especially timely as the U.S. finds itself at a critical crossroads in deciding how to reduce the national deficit to prevent bequeathing our children and grandchildren back-breaking debt. Rather than urging fiscal restraint, the President will likely pepper his speech with the word “investment”—to argue for greater government spending without explaining how he intends to pay for the growing bill.

Latinos, like the rest of the country, need a leaner and less intrusive federal government to pave the way for a much-needed economic recovery. The economic mobility that continues to elude so many Latinos will not be achieved by depending more and more on the federal government.

That’s the harsh reality that will likely be missing from the gathering.


Israel Ortega serves as The Heritage Foundation’s chief spokesman to Spanish-language media, including print, radio, television and online. And as editor of Heritage’s new Libertad (libertad.org), Ortega is responsible for producing content for and promoting what he envisions as the premier Spanish website for conservative commentary, analysis and research.

Saving the American Dream

What does the American Dream mean to you? Is it fame and fortune? Many Americans see it this way. But perhaps the American Dream is simply the essentials — a steady job that covers the basic expenses while providing the best life possible for your children.

As our country continues to weather one of the worst economic recessions in our history, it is perfectly appropriate to contemplate our future and ask ourselves if we are headed in the right direction. Moreover, it is worth studying whether the policies from Washington, D.C. are actually helping or hurting our chances for a better tomorrow — and our chances to live out our American Dream.

For the majority of us, the promise of a job and economic security was the biggest reason we left everything and everyone behind. For some of us, skyrocketing unemployment rates, inflation and corruption are just some of the horrid conditions we experienced first-hand in Latin America. And we count our blessings to live in a country with a high quality of life founded on liberty, freedom and democratic principles that continue to be celebrated and protected.

We Hispanics are an optimistic lot. Perhaps that’s why a recent poll conducted by Allstate National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll concluded that despite faring worse than non-Hispanics during this economic recession, we continue to remain optimistic about our future.

Unfortunately, there is a real cause for concern in both the short-term and long term for all Americans, including Hispanics. Beyond the immediate need to reduce the unemployment rate, unrestrained federal spending is poised to threaten our livelihood even more unless Washington lawmakers act, and fast. The sobering reality is that the federal government is borrowing 40 cents of every dollar it spends.

Raising Taxes on the Wealthy Won’t Close the Deficit

Our country is going broke. Even most spend-happy politicians can’t ignore the economic reality that is calling out for financial restraint. That’s the good news. The bad news is that their prescription is to raise taxes under the pretext of “fairness.”

One might be tempted to agree with the premise that raising taxes, particularly on the wealthy, is good policy. But it’s worth considering what raising taxes would do to our struggling economy. And would raising taxes actually close our national deficit? The evidence suggests otherwise.

First off, what is the deficit, and why is it important? Our national deficit is the difference between how much the government spends in a year and tax revenue it collects. The higher the deficit, the more government is spending in excess of its means. One doesn’t need to be an economist to understand that a deficit is detrimental to a country’s finances, as it piles up more and more debt, year after year, continually spending more than it takes in.

To avoid getting into this predicament, countries have a budget in order to help them better plan for a defined period of time. Many of us follow the same logic at home when we sit down at our kitchen table every month to pay off our various bills while putting away some money for a rainy day.

Unfortunately, Congress hasn’t been very responsible with our money, lately opting to blow it all without worrying how to pay for it all. In addition to spending carelessly, our Congress has opted to borrow money to pay for our spending binges, rather than exercising fiscal restraint — which contributes to our ballooning national debt.

As a result, our current gross debt is now more than $14 trillion.

How Poor Policy is Driving the Pain at the Pump

The pain at the pump is afflicting all Americans from coast to coast.  Paying more for gas is never pleasant, but with our country trying to crawl out of recession, this latest development is particularly unwelcome news.  Unfortunately, politics is influencing poor energy policy here in Washington, D.C., in a way that can only make matters worse.

Let’s begin with the facts. According to the American Automobile Association, the national average for a gallon of gasoline stands at nearly $4. Of course in some places that figure is much higher, as in California, which has the dubious distinction of having the highest average nationwide for a gallon of gas.

For most Americans on a budget, this price spike is a terrible blow. And even for those Americans who might rely on public transportation, an increase in gas prices still means that our dollar isn’t going as far as it used to. Higher gas prices translate into higher prices for basic groceries, for example, as retailers and distributors adjust to this change.

In short, no one escapes the pinch of escalating gas prices.

Naturally many Americans are turning to Washington, D.C., for a lifeline. Unfortunately, this administration is looking to a short-sighted political ploy that will do little to bring down gas prices in the long run.